Monthly Archives: July 2014

The Double (Ayoade, 2014)

Unique and aesthetically interesting. A mechanical future-present a la Terry Gilliam’s Brazil meets the dystopic shadows of German expressionism; an image which at once speaks to Kafka, Orwell, and other literary narcissists.  At times, the overtly stylistic maneuvers becomes obnoxious, … Continue reading

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Boyhood (Linklater, 2014)

Coming from a secularist, Boyhood is a surprisingly poetic film. Linklater is not known for crafting highly aesthetic or spiritual films, but the means by which he weaves in philosophy and questions the meaning of life is a method of … Continue reading

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Rosetta (Luc and Jean-Pierre Dardenne, 1999)

The close-up hand-camera movement is tantamount to Rosetta’s suffering, desperation, and tunnel vision. As her “friend” enters and exits the tiny frame, encircling her with his motorcycle, she powers forward until she ultimately breaks down. While the aesthetic can be … Continue reading

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