Author Archives: Kamran Ahmed

About Kamran Ahmed

I have a Masters in Cinema Studies from the University of Toronto. I work as a freelance writer and film critic in Vancouver. My writing is primarily distributed through Next Projection, an online film journal based in Toronto.

Bloodsport: A Prime Example of Affective Cinema

In spite of nostalgia’s effect on my revision, and in spite of Bloodsport’s apparent contrast to what we generally deem cinematic art, the cult-classic remains fastened on the minds of many a cinephile. Such a phenomenon surely calls for retrospection, and … Continue reading

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Compassionate Filmmaking in De Sica’s Shoeshine

A heartbreaking venture which called forward the neorealist film movement wherein De Sica became a celebrated figure. Shoeshine at once defines the genre while proffering De Sica with the tools and ideas to be reworked in his later neorealist masterpieces … Continue reading

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Pakeezah (Kamal Amrohi)

Pakeezah is a beautiful, heart rending film. Passionately developed and performed, its beatific sequences are saturated with love and beauty as is the painterly mise-en-scene which adorns the set. Highlighting the film’s merits is a wonderful soundtrack which provides entertainment … Continue reading

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Mundane History (Anocha Suwichakornpong) Review

Though rather unassuming, Mundane History conveys this dreamy energy whose effects are felt for days to come. As the title commits, the narrative events are monotonous. Yet paired with a non-linear timeline, the blatant monotony becomes the driving force of … Continue reading

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A Beautiful Poem: Kiarostami’s Life, and Nothing More…

Life, and Nothing More… is breathtaking in its simplicity. What may be seen as an overt metaphor is instead realized on a deeply spiritual and philosophical level. Kiarostami gracefully allows the film’s landscape to breathe life through the film. He places … Continue reading

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Logan: A Tale of Tragedy

Certainly one of the best ‘superhero’ films of all time, Logan separates from the pack through character depth and development akin to a Greek tragedy–perhaps of the neo-mythological kind. Logan’s arc, what a multitude of previous franchise installments have presented but … Continue reading

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Fantasy as Poetry, Fiction as Metaphor in Shinkai’s YOUR NAME

Your Name is a heartfelt, modern love story with an intricately layered narrative spanning philosophy, mythology, romance, and teenage fantasy within a science fiction melodrama. It is a brilliant feature anime, and the best I have seen since Takahata’s The … Continue reading

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A Misstep in Film History: Wim Wenders Wings of Desire and Its Masterpiece Status

Although Wenders’ film is masterfully crafted, with some absolutely glorious camera movements, use of light, black and white, and colour, the script reeks of pretense. Wender’s narrative, well intentioned as may be, is too self serious to convey fantasy, yet … Continue reading

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The Damaging Impact of a Neglectful Nation: After the Last River

Vicki Lean’s heartbreaking documentary of suffering in Attawapiskat reveals the damaging impact on first nations livelihood of industry and government regulations ostensibly designed under concealed agendas. Her expository documentary requires little convincing, as Lean makes readily observable through first hand and … Continue reading

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Is Less Truly More? James Gray’s Lost City of Z: A Masterpiece of More Cinema.

Saw this at a press screening last week and I still don’t know what to make of it exactly. I marveled at its scope and ambition, the brilliant match cuts, the striking cinematography by Darius Khondji, and its naked honesty … Continue reading

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