Tag Archives: Aesthetic

The Killing of a Chinese Bookie (Casavettes, 1976)

The Killing of a Chinese Bookie mounts Casavettes’ unique hand in raw realism via a narrowly focused narrative on a singular character’s plight of life. Shots, with a narrow angled camera–tend to bring background to the fore, intimating the character’s narrative … Continue reading

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Being, Time, and Rhythm: How Cinema as Art is Life

Rhythmic expression of time exists in three states: cinema, life, mind. When these expressions are in harmony, there is bliss. Rhythmic expression of film in harmony with man’s soul (implicit perception of time) equals acceptance of the aesthetic—declared art, love … Continue reading

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Bresson, Ranked

“Make visible what, without you, might perhaps never have been seen.” Bresson’s style of accentuating minimalist details — closing up and slowing down on body parts or material items — repletes his films with a transcendental slowing down of one’s … Continue reading

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Lancelot du Lac (Bresson, 1974)

Lancelot du Lac (1974) is the last feature film of Robert Bresson that I am to see (although I have yet to re-watch and review Au Hasard Balthazar [1966]). Set in the medieval age, the story tells of the Arthurian … Continue reading

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The Long Day Closes (Davies, 1992)

The lighting in The Long Day Closes (1992) is nothing short of brilliance. For it alone, this film is well worth seeing — a must for any avid cinephile. The specific high key lighting, both off and on screen — … Continue reading

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Mouchette (Bresson, 1967)

Mouchette (1967) tells the heart-wrenching story of a young girl tragically forced to grow up too soon. With a dying mother, alcoholic father, and a baby brother to take care of, Mouchette (Nadine Nortier), a mere teenager, is trapped in … Continue reading

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The Trial Of Joan Of Arc (Procès de Jeanne d’Arc, Bresson, 1962)

The Trial of Joan of Arc (1962), with its few settings, minimal action, and plenty of dialogue, reads more like a play than a film. Still, it retains Bresson’s particular formal style; in many ways, the extreme minimalism makes one … Continue reading

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The Devil Probably (Le Diable Probablement, Bresson, 1977)

The Devil Probably (1977) is a powerful meditation on the arbitrariness of life. Originally restricted in France to those under 18, the film developed controversy due to it’s subjectification of suicide. Many believed that it may incite suicide in certain … Continue reading

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