Tag Archives: black and white

On The Waterfront (Kazan, 1954)

On The Waterfront is a strong character film, with much film-historical relevance and classicism, which explains its current reputation and social reverence. In an almost reverse nature, I was noting not references in the film, but original scenes of which … Continue reading

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La Haine (Kassovitz, 1995)

La Haine is clearly an important precursor to films like American History X and French Blood (and probably many others). The stark black and white works really well to give the film that gritty feel of urban decay and desolation, … Continue reading

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Ordet (Dreyer, 1955)

Such perfect mastery of time and rhythm perhaps unequaled in cinema. A chamber drama with few scenes, each austerely captured by the observing and detached gaze of a languid camera, which carefully tracks the actors deeply nuanced performances in long … Continue reading

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The Artist (Hazanavicius, 2012)

An unremarkable faux-silent era film. A safe, conventional narrative in a novel, not so novel, package. Lacks the charm of the silent era, and only moderately offers silent film techniques. Way too little visual dialogue for a silent: much performance, … Continue reading

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The Turin Horse (Tarr, 2011)

For six days, man and woman each eat a potato, and then dark silence overcomes them. Ritual figures deeply in Tarr’s observation of the death of God. Metonyms of the Lord, the horse will not eat, the wind will not … Continue reading

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Les dames du Bois de Bologne (Bresson, 1945)

Les dames du Bois de Bologne (1945), his second feature, is unlike any other film by Robert Bresson. Frankly, it is his most conventional film, besides the (short) slapstick comedy, Public Affairs (1934). There is little if no poetry, subtext, … Continue reading

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