Tag Archives: film review

A Beautiful Poem: Kiarostami’s Life, and Nothing More…

Life, and Nothing More… is breathtaking in its simplicity. What may be seen as an overt metaphor is instead realized on a deeply spiritual and philosophical level. Kiarostami gracefully allows the film’s landscape to breathe life through the film. He places … Continue reading

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Birth of a Nation (Parker, 2016)

A digressive narrative dilutes the film’s sensitivity to its subject matter, rendering instead moments of presumed emotional gravitas. This is where emotional manipulation trumps sensible storytelling. Overall rather well shot and paced besides its ventures into pseudo surrealism. 63/100 – Decent.

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Les dames du Bois de Bologne (Bresson, 1945)

Les dames du Bois de Bologne (1945), his second feature, is unlike any other film by Robert Bresson. Frankly, it is his most conventional film, besides the (short) slapstick comedy, Public Affairs (1934). There is little if no poetry, subtext, … Continue reading

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