Tag Archives: Minimalism

The Immigrant (Gray, 2014)

James Gray’s The Immigrant (2014) is a landmark in American Cinema that will one day be credited as a modern masterpiece. It is a tour de force in all respects, taking the most appealing qualities of European art cinema and … Continue reading

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Bresson, Ranked

“Make visible what, without you, might perhaps never have been seen.” Bresson’s style of accentuating minimalist details — closing up and slowing down on body parts or material items — repletes his films with a transcendental slowing down of one’s … Continue reading

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Au Hasard Balthazar (Bresson, 1966)

It seems rather fitting that I end this retrospective by watching Bresson’s Au Hasard Balthazar (1966). A retrospective is to look back on a person’s work, and Au Hasard Balthazar is concomitantly both the first Bresson I ever saw, and … Continue reading

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Lancelot du Lac (Bresson, 1974)

Lancelot du Lac (1974) is the last feature film of Robert Bresson that I am to see (although I have yet to re-watch and review Au Hasard Balthazar [1966]). Set in the medieval age, the story tells of the Arthurian … Continue reading

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Les anges du péché (Angels of the Street, Bresson, 1943)

Bresson’s first serious work, Les anges du péché (1943), is all but missing his ascetic film tendencies. While absent is Bresson’s stylized punctuation — elliptical scene cuts, meticulous sound edits, and hauntingly poetic images — the film retains his sensibility. … Continue reading

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Mouchette (Bresson, 1967)

Mouchette (1967) tells the heart-wrenching story of a young girl tragically forced to grow up too soon. With a dying mother, alcoholic father, and a baby brother to take care of, Mouchette (Nadine Nortier), a mere teenager, is trapped in … Continue reading

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Diary of a Country Priest (Journal d’un curé de campagne, Bresson, 1951)

A performance of austerity on the subject of austerity. A filmmaker practices austerity to create art; a priest (Claude Laydu) practices austerity to instill faith: both seek to fluorish growth amidst the people. The ascetic habits and characteristics of the … Continue reading

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Four Nights Of A Dreamer (Quatre nuits d’un rêveur, Bresson, 1971)

What’s with this film?! The more it settles in my mind, the harder it becomes to think of anything else. To be sure, it’s not a perfect film, and has moments that are quite amateurish compared to Bresson’s other work. … Continue reading

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The Trial Of Joan Of Arc (Procès de Jeanne d’Arc, Bresson, 1962)

The Trial of Joan of Arc (1962), with its few settings, minimal action, and plenty of dialogue, reads more like a play than a film. Still, it retains Bresson’s particular formal style; in many ways, the extreme minimalism makes one … Continue reading

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The Descendants (Payne, 2011)

While The Descendants’ (2011) symbiotic nature — intimately illustrating a family’s post-tragedy togetherness — is rather conventional and predictable, the aesthetic is befitting and makes impressive what would otherwise be quite a bland film. There is a quaint silence that … Continue reading

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