Tag Archives: philosophy

On the Beach at Night Alone (Hong Sang-soo)

Sangsoo’s most emotionally resonant film builds from nothing and shares its impact in thoughts to come rather than thoughts present when watching the film. For some time, like many of Hong’s film’s, the quotidian is represented through mundane detail, seemingly … Continue reading

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Experimental Cinema, Snow & Saïto

La Région Centrale (Michael Snow, 1971, 16mm) A meditation of time itself. Challenges the viewer’s capacity for prayer as it entangles the spiritual and physical in worlds both of the reveler and the revealed through a form of fixed yet … Continue reading

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How Music Ruined a Potential Masterpiece: Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk and its Greatest Failing

There’s much in Nolan’s audacious new feature worth commending, chief among which is the underlying conceptual apparatus of time and rhythm and the greatly immersive experience it generates.  Cross cutting between three divergent storlines yet maintaining a parallel flow of … Continue reading

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Fantasy as Poetry, Fiction as Metaphor in Shinkai’s YOUR NAME

Your Name is a heartfelt, modern love story with an intricately layered narrative spanning philosophy, mythology, romance, and teenage fantasy within a science fiction melodrama. It is a brilliant feature anime, and the best I have seen since Takahata’s The … Continue reading

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A Misstep in Film History: Wim Wenders Wings of Desire and Its Masterpiece Status

Although Wenders’ film is masterfully crafted, with some absolutely glorious camera movements, use of light, black and white, and colour, the script reeks of pretense. Wender’s narrative, well intentioned as may be, is too self serious to convey fantasy, yet … Continue reading

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Life Is Like a Dream: Jarmusch’s Paterson Unfurled

Through its dreamlike aesthetic, lethargic rhythm, and patterned mise-en-scene, Jim Jarmusch’s densely philosophical tone poem manages to convey a certain unutterable phenomenology, one which is surrealistically experienced in life’s poetic coincidences and confusions. It is mindfully realized through an acute … Continue reading

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Arrival: On Intuition, Language, and A Great Film’s Greatest Failure (Villeneuve, 2016)

In spite of dropping the inimitable Roger Deakins (Prisoners–a masterpiece–, Sicario), Canada’s leading Studio director, Denis Villeneuve, has crafted a film of bracing visual detail and innovation, using primarily push ins, pull outs, and overexposure in producing haunting images of the … Continue reading

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Sátántangó Explained (Tarr, 1994)

There are many people who think the end is the beginning. It is not. At least not in the diegetic sense. The end is exactly as the doctor describes: 13 days after he is hospitalized. That is, 13 days after … Continue reading

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Out 1: Noli me tangere (1971)

This is a challenging film, and not merely due to its epic 13 hour run-time. After the events of May ’68, Rivette reached out to cinema’s potential for transformation. He decided that cinema’s necessarily political nature (‘every film is political’) … Continue reading

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A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence (Andersson, 2015)

Constructs a dry existential tone to convey the psychological malaise of living. Not particularly funny nor philosophical, though it has some superb framing and a couple moments of humour. Becomes too self-flattering and locked into its own affectations. 67/100 – … Continue reading

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