Tag Archives: psychology

Is Less Truly More? James Gray’s Lost City of Z: A Masterpiece of More Cinema.

Saw this at a press screening last week and I still don’t know what to make of it exactly. I marveled at its scope and ambition, the brilliant match cuts, the striking cinematography by Darius Khondji, and its naked honesty … Continue reading

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The Long Take and Mindfulness

Branching from my recent post on the film cut and mental anxiety, I’d like to now put into context the opposite phenomenon, the link between long takes and mindfulness, a notion that often leads to theories on the therapeutic value … Continue reading

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The Film Cut and Mental Anxiety

The cinema is conscious. This is not a novel idea. There has been much discussion of this in the world of film theory. The cinema is not only reflective of visual culture but an instance of our own reality. In … Continue reading

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Elegy of a Voyage (Sokurov, 2001)

As with Russian Ark, Sokurov creates an all encompassing atmosphere through narration and open form montage, yielding a sense of presence throughout the film. Open montage, the use of nondescript (yet no less arresting nor beautiful), non representational images, which … Continue reading

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The Babadook (Kent, 2014)

This was quite frustrating. The Babadook starts off so well, with abrupt cuts, a clean, somewhat minimalist mise-en-scene (in the vein of Stanley Kubrick), and sound effects effectively designed to startle. Through and through the film is superbly edited, shot, … Continue reading

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Crash (Cronenberg, 1996)

Cronenberg’s singular aesthetic is never more present than in the tense meanderings of the broken psyches on display, scars and flesh resembling the damage and body of the machines that first caused their psycho-pathological conflation of sexual expression and mechanical … Continue reading

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A Woman Under the Influence (Cassavetes, 1974)

After seeing one feature, Shadows, I was reluctant to watch Cassavetes a second time, in spite of @Vahn ‘s constant praise. I didn’t feel much while watching Shadows, and I could sense that his perception of reality did not align … Continue reading

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The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (Schnabel, 2007)

The blink is the cut. A truly subjective experience is rendered by formal experimentation. The lens of the camera is treated as the human eye. Its capacities are limited and faulted as the human eye. The kino-eye, or camera-eye, is … Continue reading

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Garden State (Braff, 2004)

A wistful, melancholic tone is rendered by wispy camera movements, delicate music, and a wide angle lens. Though the film is well structured and shot, it doesn’t offer much more than a pandering for salvation that never truly transpires. Zack … Continue reading

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Russian Ark (Sokurov, 2002)

Sokurov’s Russian Ark (2002) is not merely an exercise in technique; with the single take that comprises it, Russian Ark, perhaps more than any other film, illustrates film’s capacity to convey the presence of time and space within reality through … Continue reading

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