Tag Archives: Transformation

Bloodsport: A Prime Example of Affective Cinema

In spite of nostalgia’s effect on my revision, and in spite of Bloodsport’s apparent contrast to what we generally deem cinematic art, the cult-classic remains fastened on the minds of many a cinephile. Such a phenomenon surely calls for retrospection, and … Continue reading

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Deconstructing Robert Altman’s McCabe & Mrs. Miller

Because of its many moving parts and modes of storytelling, this is not an easy film to digest nor review. It is haunting and atmospheric, leaving a resonant melancholy long after viewing. And yet somehow the film does so by … Continue reading

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Out 1: Noli me tangere (1971)

This is a challenging film, and not merely due to its epic 13 hour run-time. After the events of May ’68, Rivette reached out to cinema’s potential for transformation. He decided that cinema’s necessarily political nature (‘every film is political’) … Continue reading

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Ordet (Dreyer, 1955)

Such perfect mastery of time and rhythm perhaps unequaled in cinema. A chamber drama with few scenes, each austerely captured by the observing and detached gaze of a languid camera, which carefully tracks the actors deeply nuanced performances in long … Continue reading

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